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President Donald Trump assured the nation Wednesday evening that the coronavirus crisis is reasonably well contained here in America. It’s a tricky challenge, he admits, but we’ll get through. The way we pull together in times of turmoil is one of the many things that make America so great!

Just another tricky day for America

The President made a rare prime time speech from the Oval Office on Wednesday to assure the American public that, despite media panic and finger pointing, his administration is mounting “the most aggressive and comprehensive effort to confront a foreign virus in modern history.”

Americans aren’t new to adversity. To us, its just another tricky day. “From the beginning of time, people have faced unforeseen challenges,” the President noted, “including large-scale and very dangerous health threats.” That’s simply “the way it always was and always will be.” The only thing that matters is how you respond and “we are responding with great speed and professionalism.”

“We are all in this together. We must put politics aside, stop the partisanship, and unify together as one nation and one family. As history has proven time and time again, Americans always rise to the challenge and overcome adversity.”

Taking tough measures

The coronavirus outbreak started in China and spread throughout the world, prompting the World Health Organization to officially declare a global pandemic. Here in the U.S., “we are marshalling the full power of the federal government and the private sector to protect the American people.” We must be prepared for inconvenience. but tough restrictions are necessary.

“By continuing to take these tough measures, we will significantly reduce the threat to our citizens, and we will ultimately and expeditiously defeat this virus.”

At the outbreak’s beginning, we stopped all travel to China and announced “the first federally mandated quarantine in over 50 years.” The intense action resulted in “dramatically fewer cases of the virus in the United States than are now present in Europe.”

According to our government health professionals, “several strong but necessary actions to protect the health and wellbeing of all Americans” are recommended now. The focus will be on outbreak hot spots. “We have issued guidance on school closures, social distancing, and reducing large gatherings.”

“Every community faces different risks and it is critical for you to follow the guidelines of your local officials who are working closely with our federal health experts.”

No travel or trade with Europe

We’ll be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States for the next 30 days, starting midnight Friday. This will have a huge impact on the “tremendous amount of trade and cargo” that changes hands.

For now, the U.K. will be exempt from the restrictions, which are based on the data, not fear. Things are improving in Asia so travel is expected to resume to China and South Korea shortly. “we are monitoring the situation in China and in South Korea. And, as their situation improves, we will reevaluate the restrictions and warnings that are currently in place for a possible early opening.”

Economic relief to Americans

President Trump sat down with leaders in the health insurance industry. He relates that they have agreed to “waive all co-payments for coronavirus treatments, extend insurance coverage to these treatments, and to prevent surprise medical billing.” The administration is also slashing “massive amounts of red tape to make antiviral therapies available in record time.”

Last week, the President signed a bipartisan “$8.3 billion funding bill to help CDC and other government agencies fight the virus and support vaccines, treatments, and distribution of medical supplies.” Even though there remain some snags with the test kits, “testing and testing capabilities are expanding rapidly, day by day.”

President Trump says stand by for “unprecedented” financial relief, “targeted for workers who are ill, quarantined, or caring for others due to coronavirus.”

Our economy was cushioned for the shock

“Because of the economic policies that we have put into place over the last three years, we have the greatest economy anywhere in the world, by far,” the President asserts. “Our banks and financial institutions are fully capitalized and incredibly strong. Our unemployment is at a historic low.”

That means we’re a lot better positioned to ride this tricky situation out now than we would have been under Obama. “This vast economic prosperity gives us flexibility, reserves, and resources to handle any threat that comes our way.” The President is working with the Small Business Administration to “begin providing economic loans in affected states and territories. These low-interest loans will help small businesses overcome temporary economic disruptions caused by the virus.”

He’s also “instructing the Treasury Department to defer tax payments, without interest or penalties, for certain individuals and businesses negatively impacted.”

Putting the focus on the most vulnerable

The highest risk, the President acknowledged, “is for elderly population with underlying health conditions.” They “must be very, very careful.” The administration is “strongly advising that nursing homes for the elderly suspend all medically unnecessary visits. In general, older Americans should also avoid nonessential travel in crowded areas.”

Everyone must do their part, the President insists. “It is essential that everyone take extra precautions and practice good hygiene. Each of us has a role to play in defeating this virus. Wash your hands, clean often-used surfaces, cover your face and mouth if you sneeze or cough, and most of all, if you are sick or not feeling well, stay home.”

“Our future remains brighter than anyone can imagine. Acting with compassion and love, we will heal the sick, care for those in need, help our fellow citizens, and emerge from this challenge stronger and more unified than ever before.” It’s just another tricky day for America, but we’ll get through.

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