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The House Republicans are busy at work and they have a lot of fixing to do after the damage Obama has caused to blue collar workers and the coal industry specifically.

Trump’s administration is ending the excessive environmental regulations Obama put in place.

From Time:

Republicans voted to repeal the Obama-era rules on the coal industry using the Congressional Review Act, an obscure oversight tool that could become more familiar in the coming weeks as Congress uses it to overturn regulations federal agencies issued late in Obama’s presidency.

The law hastens the process for bringing legislation to the floor and removes the hurdle of a 60-vote threshold in the Senate. Regulations imposed since June 13 can be invalidated on a simple majority vote of both GOP-led chambers and the president’s signature.

What’s more, the law prevents the executive branch from imposing substantially similar regulations in the future.

It is that aspect of the law that frightens environmental groups that have fought for years for the coal-mining rule and another rule to restrict energy companies from burning off natural gas during drilling operations on public lands.

Using the review act to overturn a federal regulation “is like burning down your house because you don’t like the paint color,” said Jenifer Collins, a clean water advocate for the environmental group Earthjustice.

Collins calls the review act “an extreme and blunt instrument” that essentially prevents federal rule-makers from addressing a topic once Congress has acted.

But House Speaker Paul Ryan and other Republicans blame Obama, saying the rules Congress is rescinding are poorly crafted and hurt people.

“The stream protection rule is really just a thinly veiled attempt to wipe out coal mining jobs,” Ryan, R-Wis., said.

“The Department of Interior’s own reports show that mines are safe and the surrounding environment is well-protected,” Ryan said, adding that the stream-protection rule ignores dozens of federal, state and local regulations already in place.

How do you feel about the stream-protection rule?

Please comment and share below… Thank you!

One Response

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You Might Like

The House Republicans are busy at work and they have a lot of fixing to do after the damage Obama has caused to blue collar workers and the coal industry specifically.

Trump’s administration is ending the excessive environmental regulations Obama put in place.

From Time:

Republicans voted to repeal the Obama-era rules on the coal industry using the Congressional Review Act, an obscure oversight tool that could become more familiar in the coming weeks as Congress uses it to overturn regulations federal agencies issued late in Obama’s presidency.

The law hastens the process for bringing legislation to the floor and removes the hurdle of a 60-vote threshold in the Senate. Regulations imposed since June 13 can be invalidated on a simple majority vote of both GOP-led chambers and the president’s signature.

What’s more, the law prevents the executive branch from imposing substantially similar regulations in the future.

It is that aspect of the law that frightens environmental groups that have fought for years for the coal-mining rule and another rule to restrict energy companies from burning off natural gas during drilling operations on public lands.

Using the review act to overturn a federal regulation “is like burning down your house because you don’t like the paint color,” said Jenifer Collins, a clean water advocate for the environmental group Earthjustice.

Collins calls the review act “an extreme and blunt instrument” that essentially prevents federal rule-makers from addressing a topic once Congress has acted.

But House Speaker Paul Ryan and other Republicans blame Obama, saying the rules Congress is rescinding are poorly crafted and hurt people.

“The stream protection rule is really just a thinly veiled attempt to wipe out coal mining jobs,” Ryan, R-Wis., said.

“The Department of Interior’s own reports show that mines are safe and the surrounding environment is well-protected,” Ryan said, adding that the stream-protection rule ignores dozens of federal, state and local regulations already in place.

How do you feel about the stream-protection rule?

Please comment and share below… Thank you!

One Response

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You Might Like

The House Republicans are busy at work and they have a lot of fixing to do after the damage Obama has caused to blue collar workers and the coal industry specifically.

Trump’s administration is ending the excessive environmental regulations Obama put in place.

From Time:

Republicans voted to repeal the Obama-era rules on the coal industry using the Congressional Review Act, an obscure oversight tool that could become more familiar in the coming weeks as Congress uses it to overturn regulations federal agencies issued late in Obama’s presidency.

The law hastens the process for bringing legislation to the floor and removes the hurdle of a 60-vote threshold in the Senate. Regulations imposed since June 13 can be invalidated on a simple majority vote of both GOP-led chambers and the president’s signature.

What’s more, the law prevents the executive branch from imposing substantially similar regulations in the future.

It is that aspect of the law that frightens environmental groups that have fought for years for the coal-mining rule and another rule to restrict energy companies from burning off natural gas during drilling operations on public lands.

Using the review act to overturn a federal regulation “is like burning down your house because you don’t like the paint color,” said Jenifer Collins, a clean water advocate for the environmental group Earthjustice.

Collins calls the review act “an extreme and blunt instrument” that essentially prevents federal rule-makers from addressing a topic once Congress has acted.

But House Speaker Paul Ryan and other Republicans blame Obama, saying the rules Congress is rescinding are poorly crafted and hurt people.

“The stream protection rule is really just a thinly veiled attempt to wipe out coal mining jobs,” Ryan, R-Wis., said.

“The Department of Interior’s own reports show that mines are safe and the surrounding environment is well-protected,” Ryan said, adding that the stream-protection rule ignores dozens of federal, state and local regulations already in place.

How do you feel about the stream-protection rule?

Please comment and share below… Thank you!

One Response

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.